New Mural at American River College, Creative Solution, being a part of public art



It initially started as four murals in ceramics to illustrate the fine and applied arts departments at American River College. Fine Arts, Culinary, Design and Film/Photography, and Theater and Music had murals depicting a story of each. An unfortunate kiln accident destroyed over half of that entire body of work. The pieces that remained were glazed then stored away for two years.


This summer Linda Gelfman and some help put together this mural. It's loosely based on a Hamsa which is symbolic of a hand of blessing in many religions. There are seven fingers, but Linda smiles and says we all need extra good fortune and good will. 


Some parts from every original mural survive, and I like the idea of unity out of diversity that arises from this piece. Like the Phoenix, this art has emerged powerful and beautiful.

 





I did not glaze all the pieces I crafted, and no one of us was solely responsible for the tiles, but I did put a lot of work into some parts like the Tower Bridge, the student dining, the chefs at work and a portrait of Linda Gelfman.



Glazed ceramics last forever (well maybe some in fragments), but a long time as anyone who has ever walked through an ancient Greek ruin can attest.

There is something about that permanence that has me near tears when I think of how many people will pass by, going to classes or visiting the Kaneko Gallery and will see our art.  

American River College has several student murals on campus from years past. I encourage you to visit the school and see this new work and those of past years. Each narrative is unique and beautiful. 



A Student Of Printmaking



A summer printmaking class. It seemed like a good idea, and in retrospect, it was for the most part. However, if you’ve ever taken a 3-unit summer course in any subject, you know how intense that class can be. I produced four works of art that I’ve documented here and got an A in the class; so, it would be churlish of me to say anything negative about the course. I really did enjoy learning the process. Emily Wilson teaches the very meticulous process-driven art forms like printmaking and bookmaking at Sacramento City College. She is a truly excellent teacher. I love these art forms and hope to take more classes in the future.
I, also, have lots of ideas for relief prints that I want to explore,
I hope a print club gets formed as I think it would be a great way to explore this art medium without the intense pressure of class.
Are there art classes you enjoy? Have you ever tried relief printmaking? Do you have a favorite printmaker?
I’d love to hear your thoughts. Critiques of my art are welcome; I do beg you to be kind. Some prints are available for sale. Please contact me if you are interested.

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